Focusing on current issues in Life Sciences, BioFIT 2016’s conference programme promises a varied and rich agenda, featuring the latest opinions on trending topics.
Supported by its prestigious Steering Committee, the sessions will focus on three themes:
• Showcasing best practices in collaborative research
• Highlighting key issues in licensing and tech transfer
• Discussing early stage innovation funding


PLENARY SESSION


TRACK 1:
BEST PRACTICES IN COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH

The recent rising popularity of the open innovation model has led pharmas, biotechs and academia to consider this as a win-win opportunity. Many types of partnerships have been developed and tested to analyze their strengths and weaknesses and how they advance innovation. We will debate the potential of this exciting, emerging model in cross sector collaborations as a new driver for rapid market access.

” Recent developments such as mobile health devices and big data are transforming the way we translate medical advances into new medicines. This track highlights how academia and industry are taking a more open and networked collaboration approach to improve the quality and richness of biomedical research. ”

Adrian CARTER
Corporate Vice-President, Global Research Networking, Boehringer Ingelheim (Germany)


TRACK 2:
KEY ISSUES IN LICENSING AND TECH TRANSFER

While academia aims to highlight knowledge and innovation, industry’s goal is to leverage this expertise and bring it to market. However, when an innovation appears from academia as a spin off or as a transferred license, many IP, due diligence, management and financing challenges arise. This track will discuss the processes and models available and the consequences on translational research.

“Pharma and biotech are looking increasingly towards academia for open innovation, explorative research and early stage discovery. But is academia prepared? Are the appropriate models and mechanisms in place to professionalise licensing and facilitate technology transfer? What about spin-outs and start-ups? Are the initial terms reasonable or a kiss of death? This track will challenge the current status of academic – industry relations. “

Ivan BAINES
Chief Operating Officer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (Germany)


TRACK 3:
EARLY STAGE INNOVATION: IDENTIFY THE RIGHT SOURCES of FUNDING

In a difficult economic climate, in which investors prefer to fund later stage companies, finding financial resources to progress your early stage project is challenging. In this track, we will discuss how VCs assess risk, non-traditional funding mechanisms available to finance early stage innovation and what a young biotech should do in order to attract investors.

“It is critical to find funding for early stage innovation and it is challenging to know what sources are available. Funding in the future will most certainly evolve. What will the trends be? It is therefore important to hear about inspirational ideas regarding different solutions in the US and Europe.”

Gunilla EKSTRÖM
Vice President Operations, Karolinska Development (Sweden)